Exercise Physiology

Exercise Physiology, or EP, is a newer profession to the health field that ties in perfectly with our goals and vision at EP Physio Plus. Our Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) often work hand-in-hand with our Physiotherapists to get you optimising your function or recovery.

Exercise Physiology is the study of how the body responds to exercise, not just with a fitness focus, but also in relation to injury, chronic disease, pain and/or disability. AEPs are tertiary trained with extensive knowledge about human anatomy, physiology, illness and injury.

No referral is required to see an Exercise Physiologist; however, if you are eligible for subsidies through Medicare, DVA, RTW, NDIS or My Aged Care, you will need a referral from your GP or service provider.

We are lucky to have not one, but two AEPs and we have interviewed our Senior AEP, Tim Manning, below to answer a few common questions we get about EP. Our friendly admin team are happy to answer more questions you may have, just give them a call on (08) 8682 6665.

Our Exercise Physiologists

What does AEP stand for and
how do you get that title?

AEP stands for Accredited Exercise Physiologist. To gain our accreditation as an AEP we must apply through ESSA (Exercise and Sports Science Australia) and have completed a minimum 4-year University degree in Clinical Exercise Physiology. Our accreditation means that we are qualified to deliver exercise to people with chronic health conditions and are covered under Medicare, DVA, private health insurers and other third-party providers.

Exercise Physiology

Why would I need to see an AEP?

There are many reasons why you might need exercise prescribed by an AEP, for example to:

  • Keep active to help manage a chronic health condition such as Heart Disease, COPD, Type 2 Diabetes or Obesity. 
  • Improve your bone health to reduce risk of fracture. 
  • Improve your balance and reduce your risk of falls
  • Reduce your injury risk from playing sport
  • Return to work following an injury/illness
  • Build up your strength and endurance following an injury 
  • Increase your general fitness and well-being
Exercise Physiology

Are you similar to a Personal Trainer?

Yes, we are very similar to a personal trainer in that we can deliver exercise in a gym-based setting and aim to motivate and support our clients to improve their quality of life. The main difference between an AEP and a Personal Trainer is the level of qualification and education we receive. AEP’s must complete a minimum of a 4-year University degree with over 500 hours of clinical experience whereas a Personal Trainer may only need to complete a 6-month course to gain their qualification. The extra training and education means that AEP’s have the knowledge and experience to deal with complex chronic health conditions and injuries and the effect that exercise can have on them. 


Exercise Physiology

Are you similar to a Physiotherapist?

Yes, we are very similar to a Physiotherapist in that we work in a clinical setting and deliver exercise to help those with musculoskeletal pain and injury. The main difference is that we are not trained in manual therapy techniques such as massage and dry-needling. Our service is solely exercise-based however we do have a larger scope of practice in terms of those who we are trained to deliver exercise to, such as individuals with cancer, mental health conditions, COPD, asthma, Type 2 Diabetes and many more. 

If you feel that you would benefit from having a chat with one of our wonderful AEPs, click 'book now' below.

Book now

Exercise Physiology

Exercise Physiology, or EP, is a newer profession to the health field that ties in perfectly with our goals and vision at EP Physio Plus. Our Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) often work hand-in-hand with our Physiotherapists to get you optimising your function or recovery.

Exercise Physiology is the study of how the body responds to exercise, not just with a fitness focus, but also in relation to injury, chronic disease, pain and/or disability. AEPs are tertiary trained with extensive knowledge about human anatomy, physiology, illness and injury.

No referral is required to see an Exercise Physiologist; however, if you are eligible for subsidies through Medicare, DVA, RTW, NDIS or My Aged Care, you will need a referral from your GP or service provider.

We are lucky to have not one, but two AEPs and we have interviewed our Senior AEP, Tim Manning, below to answer a few common questions we get about EP. Our friendly admin team are happy to answer more questions you may have, just give them a call on (08) 8682 6665.

Our Exercise Physiologists

What does AEP stand for and how do you get that title?

AEP stands for Accredited Exercise Physiologist. To gain our accreditation as an AEP we must apply through ESSA (Exercise and Sports Science Australia) and have completed a minimum 4-year University degree in Clinical Exercise Physiology. Our accreditation means that we are qualified to deliver exercise to people with chronic health conditions and are covered under Medicare, DVA, private health insurers and other third-party providers.

Exercise Physiology

Why would I need to see an AEP?

There are many reasons why you might need exercise prescribed by an AEP, for example to:

  • Keep active to help manage a chronic health condition such as Heart Disease, COPD, Type 2 Diabetes or Obesity. 
  • Improve your bone health to reduce risk of fracture. 
  • Improve your balance and reduce your risk of falls
  • Reduce your injury risk from playing sport
  • Return to work following an injury/illness
  • Build up your strength and endurance following an injury 
  • Increase your general fitness and well-being
Exercise Physiology

Are you similar to a Personal Trainer?

Yes, we are very similar to a personal trainer in that we can deliver exercise in a gym-based setting and aim to motivate and support our clients to improve their quality of life. The main difference between an AEP and a Personal Trainer is the level of qualification and education we receive. AEP’s must complete a minimum of a 4-year University degree with over 500 hours of clinical experience whereas a Personal Trainer may only need to complete a 6-month course to gain their qualification. The extra training and education means that AEP’s have the knowledge and experience to deal with complex chronic health conditions and injuries and the effect that exercise can have on them. 

Exercise Physiology

Are you similar to a Physiotherapist?

Yes, we are very similar to a Physiotherapist in that we work in a clinical setting and deliver exercise to help those with musculoskeletal pain and injury. The main difference is that we are not trained in manual therapy techniques such as massage and dry-needling. Our service is solely exercise-based however we do have a larger scope of practice in terms of those who we are trained to deliver exercise to, such as individuals with cancer, mental health conditions, COPD, asthma, Type 2 Diabetes and many more. 

If you feel that you would benefit from having a chat with one of our wonderful AEPs, click 'book now' below.